An analysis of a study of reading habits by philip larkin

The last stanza suggests that the speaker does not read because these fantasies have become "too familiar," which leads to the conclusion of the poem, which is vintage Larkin in its cynical and sarcastic viewpoint.

Interesting Literature

I broke them up like meringues. Rather, what he is saying is that it is how we use books and literature can be unhealthy and dangerous depending on what we do with them.

Either way, he ends up a loser. I wish that I had an hour a day to sit in a comfortable chair in the library with sun in my face and read classic literature.

A Study of Reading Habits

This is a fascinating poem. The way the poem starts out as descriptive, I thought it would be just another simple poem until it gets to the end. Reading can make one so much smarter. Then again, perhaps all books are of the tired, unreal, waste of our precious time mantra.

I absolutely LOVE to read. I chose books as my object simply because I found this poem and I fell in love. All his bravado is just talk and from what he has read, a fantasy world. The word club might not mean what you think, maybe he was pretending to be a ladies man. Larkin seems to delight in shocking his readers through the use of formal English in titles, such as his famous "This be the verse" and then the use of trivial and colloquial English I used to carry around at least a half-dozen novels in elementary-school and early middle school.

I broke them up like meringues. It may be a tragic trend, for the people read only commercial fiction, fantasy books, and then condemn ALL books when they grow out of these just as humanity grew out of discoor, if the people had read and enjoyed books for a better reason than fantasy escape to begin with, they would not have come to such a decision later on in life.

Clearly the examples that the speaker gives are rather unhealthy ones. Being able to read quickly benefits you on almost ANY test, because you have more time to re-read instructions, prompts, questions, answer choices, etc. And then people may grow out of them, bored with them, because the novelty wears off The beginning of the poem appears to be a kind of tribute to reading.

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I wonder if he ever hung-out with Bukowski! We can see this in this poem with the rather formal and pompous title of "A Study of Reading Habits" and the colloquial language that he uses to end the poem, where he argues that "Books are a load of crap.

Interestingly, many people are only truly happy when they are eight or nine years old.

Analysis of

Just as he is not really arguing that we should "get out" of life "while we can" and not have any children his argument in "This Be the Verse"he is not really arguing that "Books are a load of crap" in this poem. His tongue is in his cheek regardless. It is a study of reading habits: This could be the start of a wonderful new relationship with poetry.

In the modern, tv-sitcom and media type psycho-analysis this guy is the loner, a loser a guy who hid behind books to escape from his misery not because he loved books. It is confusing though, one does not know if he read about little guys tackling bullies in the books, or if the books gave him the confidence to actually go out and really have a showdown with the big bad guys in school.

That is the irony in the poem. I just have a few things to add to the very comprehensive answer provided above. Roe - Liked it on Jun 27 Books are a load of crap. This is the "study of reading habits" that is explored through the poem.

I thought it was just genius. The poet may be suggesting that many people follow this trend in reading habit.

A Study Of Reading Habits Analysis

I used to have so much time to just sit and read. The women I clubbed with sex!

Analysis of A Study of Reading Habits by Philip Larkin

Text of "A Study of Reading Habits" When getting my nose in a book Cured most things short of school, It was worth ruining my eyes To know I could still keep cool, And deal out the old right hook To dirty dogs twice my size.

The fantasy worlds in literature allow the less-than-physically impressive speaker to maintain some level of self-esteem through believing that he is able to show physical supremacy against "dirty dogs twice my size.

Later, with inch-thick specs, Evil was just my lark: For an academic such as Larkin, he is not seriously arguing that books are nothing more than "crap. Me with my cloak and fangs Had ripping times in the dark The women I clubbed with sex! Perhaps we lose our naivety, and learn the fallacy of fantasy confidence, and push ourselves to seek from reality rather than books.It is a study of reading habits: many people first like books because of the fantasy, the escape, the novelty of ideas that were wonderful enough to instill confidence (even if it was only imaginary confidence; it's still a wonderful feeling).

Nomination: A Study of Reading Habits [20 August From The Whitsun Weddings ] I was fifteen when I found ‘A Study of Reading Habits’ in an untravelled corner of a poetry anthology used in my high school. Feb 01,  · A Study Of Reading Habits By Philip Larkin When getting my nose in a book Cured most things short of school, It was worth ruining my eyes To know I could still keep cool, And deal out the old right hook To dirty dogs twice my size.

The speaker would use reading to get away from different things such as school and bullies. He didn’t care if reading ruined his eyes because in books he could imagine anything and escape reality. He could imagine being cool and fighting the bullies “twice [his] size” (line 6). A Study Of Reading Habits Philip Larkin The theme of journeys is present in Philip Larkin’s poem, A Study of Reading HabitsHowever, it is not a physical journey that we see, but a metaphorical journey about the speaker’s life progression through his changing escapisms created by books.

The title is a mock, serious title for it sounds like a piece of academic research Larkin. "A Study of Reading Habits" Philip Larkin Second Stanza: Later, with inch-thick specs, Evil was just my lark: the poem, the title, "A Study of Reading Habits", now seems ironic since it presents itself as a dry, academic study of perfecting reading habits but is actually a humorous poem about a man's dynamic relationship with books.

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An analysis of a study of reading habits by philip larkin
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